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What is Colon Cancer (Colorectal Cancer)?

Florida Hospital Cancer Institute provides the lastes and most effective diagnosis, treatment and therapy for colon cancer (colorectal cancer) in Orlando for residents of Central Florida and the surrounding regions. Colorectal cancer is an invasive process involving either the Colon or the rectum. It usually begins as a small, polyp (mushroom-shaped) some may be also known as adenoma. The majority of colon cancer polyps are benign. However, Those fleshy adenomatous growths carry a potential to turn cancerous over time. Patients may experience symptoms like bleeding or a change of bowel routine or they could be having no symptoms at all. Colorectal cancer is most often discovered by Colonoscopy, performed when symptoms present or as part of a screening. To learn more about treatment for colon cancer (colorectal cancer) in Orlando, call (407) 303-1700 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Or fill out our online assistance form and one of our coordinators will get back to you within one business day.

Causes of Colon Cancer

Currently, the cause of colon cancer is unknown, but scientists are working to find more evidence as to why these tumors are created.

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Symptoms of Colon Cancer

One of the most common signs and symptoms of colon cancer is bleeding. When bleeding occurs in sufficient volume, blood can easily be spotted in the feces. However, often times the bleeding could be to a minimum or intermittent and therefore, may not be seen. It is also referred to as “ Occult bleeding”. That can be detected in chemical testing named stool Guaiac (Fecal Occult Blood testing FOBT). When polyps and tumors grow large, other symptoms of colon cancer may also appear.

  • Unexpected constipation or diarrhea
  • Blood visible in (or on) stool
  • Anemia
  • Abdominal or gas pain
  • Atypical weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting 

To learn more about treatment for colon cancer (colorectal cancer) in Orlando, call (407) 303-1700 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Or fill out our online assistance form and one of our coordinators will get back to you within one business day.

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Risk Factors for Colon Cancer

In the United States, the risk of developing colon cancer is estimated at 7% in a person’s lifetime or about 1 in 14. Certain factors have been shown to affect those risks.

  • Colon Polyps: Most colorectal cancers start as polyps.  The removal of any polyps found during a colonoscopy reduces the risk of colon cancer later on.
  • History of cancer: Women who have had breast, ovarian, uterine or other glandular cancer are also at higher risk of developing colorectal cancer.
  • Heredity: If your family has a history of colon cancer, you may be at higher risk, especially if multiple relatives or a close relative under age 55 have had it. You will need to get screened at an earlier age. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions.
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Patients with a history of inflammatory bowel disease or ulcerative colitis have a higher chance of developing colorectal cancer.
  • Age: Cases of colorectal cancer before age 50 are less common, but rates appear to be on the rise worldwide. Your risk of developing colorectal cancer increases with age. Most cases appear in patients in the 60-70 year old range.
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Tests to Diagnose Colon Cancer

In order to properly diagnose a potential case of colon cancer, your physician may recommend an examination of your colon with either a colonoscopy or a CT scan. During a colonoscopy, a long, flexible and slender tube attached to a video camera will be passed into your rectum and colon. If your physician sees anything suspicious, other special instruments will be passed through in order to take tissue samples for a biopsy. A CT scan may be used to diagnose colon cancer by creating multiple images of your colon. This will create a detailed picture of the inside of your colon, allowing your physician to accurately diagnose whether or not you have colon cancer. 

Tests to diagnose colon cancer may include:

  • Colonoscopy 
  • CT Scan
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Treatment for Colon Cancer

Physicians at Florida Hospital Cancer Institute may treat colon cancer with surgery in order to remove as much of the tumor (s) as possible. This may or may not be followed up with radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be used in conjuction with surgery in order to kill any tumor cells that may not have been removed during surgery. Chemotherapy is also an option for tumors that may grow back after radiation. 

Surgery
Radiotherapy
Chemotherapy

For more information about treatment for colon cancer, or to schedule an appointment, call (407) 303-1700 or click here to fill out an online assistance form.

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Request an Appointment

To learn more about treatment for colon cancer (colorectal cancer) in Orlando, call (407) 303-1700 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Or fill out our online assistance form and one of our coordinators will get back to you within one business day.

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